Analysis and research-driven commentary tied to poll findings and developments in the news

Oct. 16, 2012

China inequality causes unease

Despite more than 90% of Chinese feeling that they enjoy a higher standard of living than their parents, concerns over corruption, social inequality and food safety are growing.

Sep. 24, 2012

Russians Have Their Own Ideas of Democracy

The Kremlin’s demand that the U.S. Agency for International Development cease its activities in Russia follows months of accusations by Vladimir Putin that recent anti-government protests in Russia are the result of meddling by the U.S. and other Western governments. However, many Russians may not be convinced that such meddling is a fact.

Sep. 21, 2012

How China became the US election bogeyman

With about half of Americans saying China’s rise is a major threat to the U.S., fears about China have fed into the U.S. presidential campaign. Overall, Republicans are more concerned than Democrats about China.

Sep. 19, 2012

Wait, You Still Don’t Like Us?

While the image of the United States has improved throughout many parts of the world during Barack Obama’s presidency, negative views of America remain stubbornly persistent in key Muslim countries. Much of this animosity is due to continuing concerns about U.S. power and widespread opposition to major elements of American foreign policy.

Sep. 18, 2012

How Americans See China

Most Americans describe relations between the U.S. and China as good, but most consider China a competitor rather than an enemy or partner. When asked which country represents the greatest danger to the U.S., more Americans volunteer China than name any other country, including Iran and North Korea.

Sep. 7, 2012

Have Americans Turned Inward?

At a time when the U.S. is still at war in Afghanistan, when in the eyes of foreigners U.S. stature as the hegemonic power is in question, and when a euro crisis could derail the American economy’s tenuous recovery, voters are turning inward. Nevertheless, when American national security is seen as threatened by Iran or terrorism, voters remain aggressively internationalist.

Sep. 6, 2012

U.S. Voters Mull the Economy

Public opinion surveys show that economic issues are a foremost concern for American voters. Recent history suggests that voters’ choice on November 6 will have implications not just for the economic health of the U.S. but also the global economy.

Aug. 27, 2012

Does World Want Romney or Obama?

At the Republican and Democratic National Conventions, Americans will notionally be choosing their candidates for president of the United States. The world’s citizens get no say in this choice. Nevertheless, people outside the U.S. have definite opinions about Obama and some of the key issues in the campaign.

Aug. 9, 2012

World to America: We want soft, not hard power

With less than three months to go in the U.S. presidential election, the candidates’ debate over America’s place in the world can only be expected to escalate. Recent public opinion surveys suggest that people outside the United States question American hard power and increasingly embrace U.S. soft power. Whoever is president in 2013, the success abroad of his foreign policy may depend on achieving the right balance in the exercise of American hard and soft power.

Aug. 3, 2012

Muslims Want Democracy

Since the beginning of the Arab Spring, analysts, policymakers, and pundits have debated whether democracy will actually take root in the Middle East. One thing, however, is clear: People in Arab nations want democracy, and they don’t just support a vague notion of democracy – they want to live in a country that has specific rights and institutions.

Jul. 26, 2012

The World Is Losing Faith in Hard Work

Add faith in the work ethic and in capitalism to the lengthening list of casualties from the Great Recession. Four years after the Lehman Brothers’ fiasco and the ensuing global economic downturn, the idea that effort in a competitive economy can lead to success is seriously questioned in a number of major economies, including Japan, Russia and Greece, especially among those who have suffered the most.

Jul. 12, 2012

Emerging Economies – Rich And Confident

The emerging economies account for an increasing share of the globe’s billionaires. But widespread public attitudes can wield far more influence over an economy than the wealth of a few hundred people. While people polled in the US and Europe are pessimistic about their future prospects, citizens of the emerging economies, especially China and Brazil, are optimistic about their own national economies and personal wealth.

Jul. 12, 2012

The Missing Piece In Arab Democracy

More than a year after the 2011 uprisings, Arab publics are concerned about the economy, but hopeful about democracy.

Jul. 11, 2012

Are Germans really opposed to bailouts?

Chancellor Angela Merkel’s refusal to dig deep to help indebted eurozone countries is commonly explained by two feelings attributed to German voters – an ingrained fear of inflation and a reluctance to bail out those in trouble. But polling suggests the picture is more complex.

Jun. 28, 2012

Morsi’s Election Highlights Egyptian Views of Islam’s Role in New Democracy

The declaration of Mohamed Morsi as Egypt’s first freely elected president marks a major milestone for a country that until February 2011 had spent nearly three decades under the authoritarian rule of Hosni Mubarak. At the same time, for significant numbers of Egyptians, Morsi’s relatively narrow victory over former Prime Minister Ahmed Shafiq has the potential to raise questions about Islam’s role in society.

May. 23, 2012

Egypt on the Eve of Elections: Economy, Democracy Are Both Priorities

On the eve of the first presidential election of the post-Mubarak era, Egyptians remain hopeful about the future of their country, and they strongly desire both an improved economy and the democratic freedoms they were denied under the previous regime.

Mar. 6, 2012

Does Humanitarian Aid Improve America’s Image?

U.S. humanitarian aid helped improve America’s image in Japan following the devastating March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami. However, recent examples from Indonesia and Pakistan show that the impact of disaster relief on ratings for the U.S. has its limits.

Sep. 7, 2011

From Hyperpower to Declining Power

Since the Sept. 11 attacks, views about American power have changed, as economic issues have trumped security concerns. Today, many see the U.S. as a great power in decline.

Jul. 14, 2011

The World Says China Will Overtake America

In the past decade, anti-Americanism grew around the world. In sharp contrast, today America is seen as on its way to losing its status as the dominant global superpower.

Mar. 31, 2011

Upbeat Chinese Public May Not Be Primed for a Jasmine Revolution

Judging the Chinese appetite for democracy is not easy, but polling suggests China may not be ripe for the kind of uprisings seen throughout the Middle East.

Mar. 8, 2011

Will Enthusiasm for Democracy Endure in Egypt and Elsewhere?

Pro-democracy movements in Tunisia and Egypt recall the wave of democratization that took place two decades ago in Eastern Europe. The experience of Eastern Europe is a useful reminder that public enthusiasm for democracy is not guaranteed as political change extends over years and decades.

Jan. 31, 2011

Egypt, Democracy and Islam

Majorities of Egyptian Muslims believe that democracy is preferable to any other kind of government, and by wide margins, Muslims in Egypt say that Islam plays a positive role in their country’s politics.

Aug. 27, 2010

Obama’s Middle East Problem

While global publics largely take a positive view of President Obama, he receives his lowest marks on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict – and his ratings are especially poor in the Arab nations of the Middle East.

May. 19, 2010

Czechs’ Commitment to Free Markets and Democracy Stays Strong Amidst Troubled Economic and Political Waters

With an election approaching, Czechs are unhappy with conditions in their country and frustrated with the way democracy is working, but are committed to free market economics and democratic values.

Apr. 7, 2010

Hungary Dissatisfied with Democracy, but Not Its Ideals

With parliamentary elections approaching, Hungarians are dissatisfied with their economy and with the current state of democracy in their country. However, they still value democratic rights and institutions.

Mar. 29, 2010

Ukraine Says ’No’ to NATO

New Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych’s move to ban Ukraine from becoming a member of NATO is not without a base of public support.

Mar. 18, 2010

Indonesia: The Obama Effect

President Barack Obama’s popularity has transformed America’s image in Indonesia. However, the world’s largest predominantly Muslim country is an outlier in the Muslim world, where opinions of the U.S. remain mostly negative.

Mar. 5, 2010

Reviving America’s Global Image

In a briefing for a congressional subcommittee, Andrew Kohut describes the rise of anti-Americanism over the last decade, its sharp decline after Obama’s election and the reasons why this improving trend may be fragile.

Jan. 20, 2010

The Post-Communist Generation in the Former Eastern Bloc

Members of the post-communist generation offer much more positive evaluations of the political and economic changes their countries have undergone over the past two decades than do those who were adults when communism collapsed.

Jan. 14, 2010

Ukraine’s National Election – a Problem of Democracy?

Economy, Poor Leadership, Corruption Key