Commentary Feb. 3, 2014

The Cost of Growing Older

By 2050, rapidly graying populations are likely to impose an unprecedented fiscal burden on the United States, many European countries, Japan, and South Korea.

Commentary Jan. 30, 2014

What the Graying World Can Teach America

Fiscal and societal burdens of an aging America are far from unique; Europe and increasingly much of Asia face a far more challenging future in which there is a mismatch between demographics and slowing economic growth.

Jan. 30, 2014

Global Population Estimates by Age, 1950-2050

The demographic future for the U.S. and the world looks very different than the recent past. Growth from 1950 to 2010 was rapid—the global population nearly tripled, and the U.S. population doubled. However, population growth from 2010 to 2050 is projected to be significantly slower and is expected to tilt strongly to the oldest age […]

Survey Reports Jan. 30, 2014

Attitudes about Aging: A Global Perspective

In a Rapidly Graying World, Japanese Are Worried, Americans Aren’t

Commentary Jan. 27, 2014

The Limited Allure of Extremism

If recent history is any guide, extremists’ current momentum will likely be followed by a strong backlash. Indeed, generally speaking, the more people are exposed to extremist violence and al-Qaeda-style rule, the less they like it.

Commentary Jan. 16, 2014

Americans Want to Turn Away From World’s Problems

In 2013 there is an unprecedented lack of support for American engagement with the rest of the world. The public suggests that the nation does too much to solve world problems.

Commentary Jan. 14, 2014

U.S. Isolationism Isn’t Protectionism

New polling data showing that the American public is turning inward, preoccupied with domestic affairs and less interested in international engagement, is not evidence of a rise in U.S. economic protectionism, with its grave consequences for global business.

Commentary Jan. 6, 2014

Killer Elite

The disconnect in perception and priorities between experts and the general public reflects the inevitable tension between policy and politics in any democratic country; but it also comes with an often contradictory and confusing mixed message to foreigners about America’s intentions on the world stage.

Commentary Jan. 3, 2014

World Still Downbeat on Economic Prospects

The widely shared disconnect between the world’s modest recovery from the Great Recession and the public mood is testimony to the depth of the downturn and the persistence of unemployment.

Commentary Dec. 20, 2013

Americans Deeply Divided on Foreign Policy

With national debates looming next year over Iran, Syria, the Israeli-Palestinian peace process, trade and China, continued partisan discord is probably unavoidable. What may be different this time is the shear depth of that partisan divide.

Commentary Dec. 18, 2013

T-Tipped

As free trade negotiations with Europe proceed, Americans seem predisposed toward trade liberalization, especially with the European Union. But concerns about the impact of trade on wages and jobs and a generational pivot toward Asia suggest that TTIP is not a slam dunk.

Commentary Dec. 17, 2013

A Not So “Special Relationship”

On discreet foreign policy issues of topical bilateral concern, there is often general agreement on broad issues between the British and American publics and disagreement on specifics.

Commentary Dec. 17, 2013

Public Opinion May Restrict Obama’s Second-Term Foreign Policy

Recent developments regarding Iran, Syria and China suggest that President Barack Obama, like his predecessors, will concentrate more on international issues as his presidency winds down. The American public, however, may not let him do so.

Commentary Dec. 5, 2013

NSA Spying: A Threat to U.S. Interests?

Revelations by Edward Snowden of U.S. National Security Agency spying have exposed both similarities and differences in public attitudes toward privacy among Europeans and Americans.

Commentary Dec. 4, 2013

Americans See Declining U.S. Prestige

The American public thinks that the United States does too much to try to solve the world’s problems, and increasing percentages want the U.S. to “mind its own business internationally” and pay more attention to problems at home.

Commentary Dec. 4, 2013

India ‘More Important’ Than China As an Ally to U.S.

While Americans are more open to economic engagement than they have been in the past, they also continue to exhibit a wariness about refocusing U.S. policy toward Asia and have misgivings about accepting more high-skilled immigrants.

Commentary Dec. 4, 2013

Downward-Facing Obama

Foreign policy, once a relative strength for President Obama, has now become a target of substantial criticism among both the general public and foreign policy experts.

Commentary Dec. 4, 2013

Most Americans Want Washington to Mind Its Own Business Overseas

Americans’ willingness to take on new international burdens is at an all-time low, and it is not clear that a rebalancing of U.S. interests and engagement toward East, Southeast and South Asia has the full support of the American people.

Commentary Nov. 21, 2013

Americans and Israelis Don’t See Eye to Eye on Iran

As negotiators convene in Geneva in an effort to reach agreement on curbing Iran’s nuclear program, the American people are supportive of a deal, even though they are fairly cynical about the likelihood of it working.

Commentary Nov. 19, 2013

U.S. Image on Roller Coaster Ride Since Cold War

America’s rise in the 50 years since President Kennedy was killed has been far from trouble-free – and America’s international standing since the fall of its great Cold War rival has reflected the ups, downs and uncertainties of the past five decades.

Survey Reports Nov. 8, 2013

Despite Challenges, Africans Are Optimistic about the Future

Economic Outlook More Positive in Africa than Europe or Middle East

Commentary Nov. 6, 2013

Is Tide Turning Over Immigration Views?

Even as the immigration policy debate continues to intensify, the issue looks like it might be about to take another twist as the sharp decline in the U.S. population of unauthorized immigrants that accompanied the 2007-2009 recession bottoms out. Americans now appear ready for a new approach to immigration policy.

Commentary Nov. 4, 2013

Trading Privacy for Security

Americans believe that the National Security Agency may have gone too far in spying on U.S. allies. They also think that the NSA has intruded on personal privacy in scooping up massive amounts of phone calls and emails, but don’t expect to see citizens taking to the streets.

Commentary Nov. 4, 2013

While focus on foreign problems lessens, U.S. public keeps its eye on China

While the American public increasingly has been looking inward after years of economic stress at home and a decade of wars abroad, they have a keen awareness of the challenges posed to the U.S. by China in the superpower competition between the two countries.

Survey Reports Oct. 24, 2013

Mexicans and Salvadorans Have Positive Picture of Life in U.S.

Widespread Concern about Drugs and Gangs at Home

Commentary Oct. 23, 2013

Chinese unease growing at flip side of progress

After a remarkable run of economic expansion that has lifted tens of millions out of poverty, the Chinese public is waking up to the side effects of progress.

Survey Reports Oct. 17, 2013

Saudi Arabia’s Image Falters among Middle East Neighbors

Mixed Views of Saudi Influence, Record on Civic Freedoms

Commentary Oct. 16, 2013

How West Sees Iran’s Nuclear Program

As American, European, Russian, Chinese and Iranian negotiators jockey in Geneva over ending the West’s economic sanctions on Tehran in return for a dismantling of Iran’s nuclear weapons program, European and U.S. publics are sending negotiators on both sides a clear message: they oppose Iran having nuclear armaments.

Commentary Oct. 14, 2013

Next Year in Jerusalem

As Washington ramps up its efforts to get the Israelis and Palestinians to fashion a lasting settlement of their differences, there is no uniform American Jewish viewpoint on the peace process.

Commentary Oct. 1, 2013

Is Democracy Dead in the Birthplace of the Arab Spring?

In the wake of rising public unrest, Tunisia’s government has announced it will step down and begin talks with the opposition about forming an interim administration in the run-up to new parliamentary and presidential elections.