Jun. 4, 2013

Global Acceptance of Homosexuality

There is broad acceptance of homosexuality in North America, the European Union, and much of Latin America. However, rejection of homosexuality is equally widespread in predominantly Muslim nations and in sub-Saharan Africa, as well as in parts of Asia and in Russia. Views of homosexuality are particularly positive in Spain (88% say it should be […]

Commentary May. 28, 2013

World Worried about Inequality

Income inequality has been growing at an increasingly rapid pace. And publics around the world – and especially in Europe – are taking note.

Commentary May. 27, 2013

Abenomics’ Challenge: The Japanese Attitude

Government must bridge gap between personal, national expectations

May. 23, 2013

Global Econ Quiz

Test how much you know about economic attitudes in the world, based on an international survey by the Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes Project.

May. 23, 2013

Advanced Economies Report Lowest Deprivation

While people in advanced economies are most bearish about their economic situation, they report very low levels of deprivation relative to others around the world, including people in emerging nations who are more positive and optimistic about economic conditions. Reports of deprivation are closely related to national wealth. For example, in Australia, Canada and Germany […]

May. 23, 2013

Widespread Dissatisfaction with Economy

Publics around the world are decidedly unhappy about their nations’ economies. However, citizens of emerging market countries are overall more pleased with their economies than are people in advanced or developing economies. A median of 53% in emerging markets say their national economy is doing well, compared with 33% in developing countries and 24% in […]

Survey Reports May. 23, 2013

Economies of Emerging Markets Better Rated During Difficult Times

Global Downturn Takes Heavy Toll; Inequality Seen as Rising

Survey Reports May. 16, 2013

Egyptians Increasingly Glum

Not Optimistic about Economy or Certain They Are Better Off Post-Mubarak

Commentary May. 14, 2013

The New Sick Man of Europe

Today, it is the European Union itself that is the sick man of Europe. Efforts over the past half-century to create a more united continent are now the principal casualties of the ongoing eurozone crisis. This creates yet another complication for European leaders as they attempt to craft a way forward in dealing with the economic and political consequences of the ‘Great Recession’.

Commentary May. 14, 2013

Threat to the EU: German Exceptionalism Poses a Challenge

The euro crisis has exposed a range of intra-European problems long hidden from the harsh light of day. Not the least of these is German exceptionalism. Over the last two generations one goal of the European project has been to narrow the differences between Germany and the rest of Europe. But recent economic difficulties have only amplified those dissimilarities.

Commentary May. 14, 2013

Europeans Grow Dissatisfied with the Inequities of the Economic System

A major casualty of the euro crisis has been Europeans’ faith in the fairness of their economic system. In what is now the fifth year in the wake of the Great Recession, Europeans believe that inequality is now a major problem in their societies and think that things will only get worse.

Survey Reports May. 13, 2013

The New Sick Man of Europe: the European Union

French Dispirited; Attitudes Diverge Sharply from Germans

Commentary May. 13, 2013

France and Germany: A Tale of Two Countries Drifting Apart

A political, economic and demographic divide has opened up between France and Germany. The two countries, which have for decades been the driving force behind European integration, increasingly see the world through different lenses. This new evidence of a dramatic divergence of public opinion raises new questions about prospects for the European Project.

Commentary May. 10, 2013

What Pakistan Thinks

As the country prepares for this weekend’s elections, the Taliban has significantly stepped up its attacks. And no matter which party emerges victorious from the May 11 poll, it will have to answer to a public that is increasingly worried about the threat extremism poses to the Pakistani state.

Survey Reports May. 9, 2013

Despite Their Wide Differences, Many Israelis and Palestinians Want Bigger Role for Obama in Resolving Conflict

Survey Report Israelis and Palestinians differ widely in their outlook for a peaceful resolution of their longstanding conflict and in their views about the United States. But both want U.S. President Barack Obama to play a larger role in resolving the Israeli-Palestinian stalemate. Israelis, on balance, believe a way can be found for an independent […]

Commentary May. 8, 2013

Pakistani Opposition Leaders Get High Marks in Run-up to Elections

When 91% of the public thinks the country is on the wrong track, it’s usually a good sign for the opposition’s electoral hopes, and as Pakistan prepares for parliamentary elections, supporters of two major opposition parties are feeling optimistic. Moreover, as a new Pew Research Center poll highlights, the leaders of those two parties are getting positive reviews from the public.

Survey Reports May. 7, 2013

On Eve of Elections, a Dismal Public Mood in Pakistan

Rising Concerns about the Taliban

Commentary May. 2, 2013

Little International Support for Arming Syria Rebels

Growing evidence that the Syrian government may have used chemical weapons against its own people has led to demands for the U.S. to intervene in the Syrian civil war. As American pundits and politicians call for intervention, however merited or unjustified those appeals may be on humanitarian grounds, such pleas have yet to rally majority support for such action in America, Europe or the Middle East.

Survey Reports May. 1, 2013

Widespread Middle East Fears that Syrian Violence Will Spread

No Love for Assad, Yet No Support for Arming the Rebels

Commentary May. 1, 2013

How Mexicans See America

Mexican approval ratings of the U.S. are at their highest point since 2009. This boost in America’s image comes amidst rising expectations that Washington may soon reform U.S. immigration laws. The question now is whether the two countries can build on the promise fostered by the proposed immigration policy and cement some of the progress that appears to have been made.

Survey Reports Apr. 29, 2013

U.S. Image Rebounds in Mexico

Fewer See Better Life North of the Border, but 35% Would Migrate

Commentary Apr. 3, 2013

Americans Divided over Immigration Reform

The immigration debate in Washington is likely to heat up in the weeks ahead. Indians, Chinese and others either hoping to migrate to America (even those with advanced skills) or those with loved ones living illegally and precariously within the United States should realize that despite largely supportive rhetoric emanating from both Congress and the White House, the U.S. public remains divided over immigration reform.

Commentary Apr. 1, 2013

Americans’ Support for TPP Remains Untested

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s announcement that Japan will join negotiations to create a Trans-Pacific Partnership with the U.S. and other Pacific Basin nations won early support from the Japanese people, according to snap surveys following his statement. The decision was also welcomed in official circles in Washington, D.C., where the Obama administration has long supported Japan becoming party to the talks.

Commentary Mar. 20, 2013

What Japanese and Americans Think about Each Other

Japan’s decision to join negotiations to create a Trans-Pacific Partnership with the United States and other Pacific nations reflects, in part, the sea change in public opinion that has transformed U.S.-Japan relations. The upcoming TPP negotiations will be contentious. But the political context in which these talks will take place is far more supportive than ever before.

Commentary Mar. 19, 2013

Obama’s Israel Challenge

Criticized by some for being insufficiently pro-Israel during his first term, and dogged by relatively low ratings in Israel, President Obama travels there this week to deliver a major address in Jerusalem. The Obama administration can only hope this speech is more warmly received among Israelis than his last high-profile address in the region at Cairo University in June 2009.

Commentary Mar. 13, 2013

What Chinese Are Worried About

When incoming Chinese President Xi Jinping takes office, he will be dealing with a public that is increasingly concerned about issues beyond simple economic growth. Such problems will provide some daunting challenges for the new president and his team over the next few years.

Commentary Mar. 4, 2013

Will Budget Cuts = Isolationism?

The forced budget cuts, known in Washington as sequestration, are now in force. These reductions in defense spending, anti-terrorism activities, foreign aid and the budget for the State Department will shrink the U.S. footprint around the world, with consequences for the projection of both U.S. hard and soft power.

Feb. 22, 2013

Secretary of State John Kerry’s Travel Itinerary

  John Kerry will take his first trip abroad as Secretary of State from February 24 to March 6, travelling to Europe and the Middle East. In Europe, he will visit Britain, Germany, France and Italy, where he will discuss bilateral relations as well as the ongoing conflicts in Mali and Syria. America’s image remains […]

Commentary Feb. 22, 2013

American Star Power Still Rules the Globe

Surveys consistently show that movies – and more broadly, American popular culture – are a strong suit of U.S. soft power. And, while studio executives spend considerably more time thinking about box office returns than public diplomacy, Tinseltown is actually pretty effective at nudging America’s international image in a positive direction.

Commentary Feb. 19, 2013

The Public Supports a Transatlantic Trade Pact – For Now

The ultimate public verdict on a U.S.-EU trade and investment agreement has yet to be rendered, but on the eve of such negotiations, both Americans and Europeans seem disposed to try.