Commentary May. 14, 2013

Europeans Grow Dissatisfied with the Inequities of the Economic System

A major casualty of the euro crisis has been Europeans’ faith in the fairness of their economic system. In what is now the fifth year in the wake of the Great Recession, Europeans believe that inequality is now a major problem in their societies and think that things will only get worse.

Survey Reports May. 13, 2013

The New Sick Man of Europe: the European Union

French Dispirited; Attitudes Diverge Sharply from Germans

Commentary May. 13, 2013

France and Germany: A Tale of Two Countries Drifting Apart

A political, economic and demographic divide has opened up between France and Germany. The two countries, which have for decades been the driving force behind European integration, increasingly see the world through different lenses. This new evidence of a dramatic divergence of public opinion raises new questions about prospects for the European Project.

Commentary May. 10, 2013

What Pakistan Thinks

As the country prepares for this weekend’s elections, the Taliban has significantly stepped up its attacks. And no matter which party emerges victorious from the May 11 poll, it will have to answer to a public that is increasingly worried about the threat extremism poses to the Pakistani state.

Survey Reports May. 9, 2013

Despite Their Wide Differences, Many Israelis and Palestinians Want Bigger Role for Obama in Resolving Conflict

Survey Report Israelis and Palestinians differ widely in their outlook for a peaceful resolution of their longstanding conflict and in their views about the United States. But both want U.S. President Barack Obama to play a larger role in resolving the Israeli-Palestinian stalemate. Israelis, on balance, believe a way can be found for an independent […]

Commentary May. 8, 2013

Pakistani Opposition Leaders Get High Marks in Run-up to Elections

When 91% of the public thinks the country is on the wrong track, it’s usually a good sign for the opposition’s electoral hopes, and as Pakistan prepares for parliamentary elections, supporters of two major opposition parties are feeling optimistic. Moreover, as a new Pew Research Center poll highlights, the leaders of those two parties are getting positive reviews from the public.

Survey Reports May. 7, 2013

On Eve of Elections, a Dismal Public Mood in Pakistan

Rising Concerns about the Taliban

Commentary May. 2, 2013

Little International Support for Arming Syria Rebels

Growing evidence that the Syrian government may have used chemical weapons against its own people has led to demands for the U.S. to intervene in the Syrian civil war. As American pundits and politicians call for intervention, however merited or unjustified those appeals may be on humanitarian grounds, such pleas have yet to rally majority support for such action in America, Europe or the Middle East.

Survey Reports May. 1, 2013

Widespread Middle East Fears that Syrian Violence Will Spread

No Love for Assad, Yet No Support for Arming the Rebels

Commentary May. 1, 2013

How Mexicans See America

Mexican approval ratings of the U.S. are at their highest point since 2009. This boost in America’s image comes amidst rising expectations that Washington may soon reform U.S. immigration laws. The question now is whether the two countries can build on the promise fostered by the proposed immigration policy and cement some of the progress that appears to have been made.

Survey Reports Apr. 29, 2013

U.S. Image Rebounds in Mexico

Fewer See Better Life North of the Border, but 35% Would Migrate

Commentary Apr. 3, 2013

Americans Divided over Immigration Reform

The immigration debate in Washington is likely to heat up in the weeks ahead. Indians, Chinese and others either hoping to migrate to America (even those with advanced skills) or those with loved ones living illegally and precariously within the United States should realize that despite largely supportive rhetoric emanating from both Congress and the White House, the U.S. public remains divided over immigration reform.

Commentary Apr. 1, 2013

Americans’ Support for TPP Remains Untested

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s announcement that Japan will join negotiations to create a Trans-Pacific Partnership with the U.S. and other Pacific Basin nations won early support from the Japanese people, according to snap surveys following his statement. The decision was also welcomed in official circles in Washington, D.C., where the Obama administration has long supported Japan becoming party to the talks.

Commentary Mar. 20, 2013

What Japanese and Americans Think about Each Other

Japan’s decision to join negotiations to create a Trans-Pacific Partnership with the United States and other Pacific nations reflects, in part, the sea change in public opinion that has transformed U.S.-Japan relations. The upcoming TPP negotiations will be contentious. But the political context in which these talks will take place is far more supportive than ever before.

Commentary Mar. 19, 2013

Obama’s Israel Challenge

Criticized by some for being insufficiently pro-Israel during his first term, and dogged by relatively low ratings in Israel, President Obama travels there this week to deliver a major address in Jerusalem. The Obama administration can only hope this speech is more warmly received among Israelis than his last high-profile address in the region at Cairo University in June 2009.

Commentary Mar. 13, 2013

What Chinese Are Worried About

When incoming Chinese President Xi Jinping takes office, he will be dealing with a public that is increasingly concerned about issues beyond simple economic growth. Such problems will provide some daunting challenges for the new president and his team over the next few years.

Commentary Mar. 4, 2013

Will Budget Cuts = Isolationism?

The forced budget cuts, known in Washington as sequestration, are now in force. These reductions in defense spending, anti-terrorism activities, foreign aid and the budget for the State Department will shrink the U.S. footprint around the world, with consequences for the projection of both U.S. hard and soft power.

Feb. 22, 2013

Secretary of State John Kerry’s Travel Itinerary

  John Kerry will take his first trip abroad as Secretary of State from February 24 to March 6, travelling to Europe and the Middle East. In Europe, he will visit Britain, Germany, France and Italy, where he will discuss bilateral relations as well as the ongoing conflicts in Mali and Syria. America’s image remains […]

Commentary Feb. 22, 2013

American Star Power Still Rules the Globe

Surveys consistently show that movies – and more broadly, American popular culture – are a strong suit of U.S. soft power. And, while studio executives spend considerably more time thinking about box office returns than public diplomacy, Tinseltown is actually pretty effective at nudging America’s international image in a positive direction.

Commentary Feb. 19, 2013

The Public Supports a Transatlantic Trade Pact – For Now

The ultimate public verdict on a U.S.-EU trade and investment agreement has yet to be rendered, but on the eve of such negotiations, both Americans and Europeans seem disposed to try.

Commentary Feb. 18, 2013

How America and Japan See the World

The U.S.-Japan relationship has gone through numerous ups and downs in the last few decades and Americans’ fears that Japan Inc. will overwhelm them have subsided. Yet challenges remain: how to jointly deal with China, North Korea and Iran, and whether Tokyo will join with other Asian governments and Washington in creating a transpacific free trade area.

Commentary Feb. 11, 2013

China and Cyber Attacks: A Top Concern of U.S. Experts

China’s alleged cyber-espionage campaigns against other governments, major corporations and, most recently, the media, have increasingly become a focus of U.S. officials and news reports. In the superpower competition between the U.S. and China, most American experts ranked cyber attacks from China as a more serious problem than the economic or military challenges it poses.

Commentary Feb. 7, 2013

Seeds of Unrest in Pakistan’s Economy

The news out of Pakistan is unrelentingly bad, but headline-grabbing events obscure a more insidious problem: the profound economic challenges facing Pakistani society. And this economic malaise is worsening, thus complicating India’s relationship with its neighbour.

Commentary Feb. 6, 2013

The U.S. Focuses on Its Homefront

The president’s inaugural address and the confirmation testimony of Kerry and Hagel are being scrutinized by foreigners for signs of America’s international intentions. To separate lofty ambitions from practical realities, their statements must be interpreted in the context of U.S. public opinion – and that means they should be taken with a large grain of salt.

Commentary Jan. 28, 2013

Viewpoint: Pakistan’s Economic Woes Are Being Overlooked

Pakistan is a country beset with political difficulties, but they could be of secondary importance to its economic woes. The truth is that the Pakistani people are deeply troubled by the plight of their economy and their own economic prospects.

Commentary Jan. 28, 2013

Is Obama Out of Step with America on Foreign Policy?

The U.S. president’s inaugural address is a speech heard and read around the world, and is interpreted as a sign of America’s intentions going forward. To separate lofty ambitions from more practical realities, it needs to be interpreted in the context of U.S. public opinion.

Commentary Jan. 28, 2013

The U.S. Fiscal Cliff Redux

At the turn of the year the United States avoided careening over a fiscal cliff – which would have triggered recession-inducing automatic tax increases and spending cuts – by passing legislation that raised some taxes, but did little to cut spending.

Commentary Jan. 24, 2013

The Tahrir Square Legacy: Egyptians Want Democracy, a Better Economy, and a Major Role for Islam

Two years after Egyptians first poured into Cairo’s Tahrir Square chanting “Down with Mubarak” the legacy of the Arab Spring remains uncertain. Polling since the uprising shows that Egyptians want democratic rights and institutions, a major role for Islam in political life, and an improved economy – a challenging set of demands for the new cadre of Egyptian leaders.

Commentary Jan. 15, 2013

Public Attitudes Toward the Next Social Contract

Recent deliberations in Washington have triggered a national debate about key elements of the social safety net. Why the U.S. invests relatively less in its social safety net than many other countries reflect Americans’ conflicted, partisan and often contradictory views on fairness, inequality, the role and responsibility of government and individuals in society and the efficacy of government action.

Commentary Jan. 10, 2013

2013: A Fateful Year

The year ahead promises both challenges and opportunities for transatlantic relations. The next 12 months could prove to be consequential for both security and economic ties between Europe and the United States.