Commentary Dec. 10, 2012

U.S.-China Economic Relations in the Wake of the U.S. Election

What does Obama’s return to the White House portend for U.S.-China economic relations? The U.S. public wants Washington to ratchet up the pressure on Beijing, but history suggests that there are geo-political constraints to doing so.

Commentary Dec. 4, 2012

Anti-Americanism Down in Europe, but a Values Gap Persists

Europeans generally reacted positively to President Obama’s re-election, just as they did four years ago. But despite Obama’s re-election at home and continued popularity in Europe, his presidency has not closed the long-running transatlantic values gap on issues such as the use of military force, religion, and individualism.

Commentary Nov. 26, 2012

The Day After: Obama Triumph Sobered by Unmet Global Expectations

Much of the world cheered the re-election of U.S. president Barack Obama. But the president’s honeymoon may be short lived. Disappointment with Obama’s first term foreign policy may challenge both his popularity and his ability to present a positive image of the United States around the globe.

Commentary Nov. 21, 2012

Post-election America still divided

The election is over. The voters have spoken. But those who thought that a clear-cut verdict in the recent presidential election would finally break the partisan deadlock in Washington may find themselves disappointed.

Commentary Nov. 9, 2012

Obama’s Global Challenges

American elections are consequential events and President Obama’s reelection is likely to bring to a head a number of long-smoldering economic and strategic concerns. His biggest challenge may be to bridge the divides among the American people and with America’s allies.

Commentary Nov. 8, 2012

Transatlantic Relations in Obama’s Second Term

The re-election of Barack Obama as the next president of the United States has ramifications—good, bad and indifferent—for transatlantic relations.

Commentary Nov. 7, 2012

Obama has a mandate. Sort of.

Obama now has a mandate to govern. But his mandate domestically, and internationally, on specific issues is far from clear.

Nov. 1, 2012

How Americans and Chinese View Each Other

Over the past year, public opinion surveys in the United States and China have shown evidence of rising tensions between the two countries on a host of issues. These include increasingly negative perceptions of each other and concern over economic and trade policies. This infographic explores these views. For more, see our collection of reports […]

Commentary Nov. 1, 2012

American, Chinese Publics Increasingly Wary of the Other

As economic and geopolitical competition grows between the U.S. and China, Americans say they want to get tougher with China on economic issues and the Chinese hold a more negative view of relations with the U.S.

Oct. 22, 2012

U.S. Global Image Quiz

To test how much you know about the worldwide image of the United States, we invite you to take our short 10-question quiz. Then see how you did and browse our reports and interactive database to learn more about how people around the world view the U.S. and President Barack Obama, as well as their […]

Commentary Oct. 22, 2012

The Whole World is Watching

Heading into the third and final presidential election debate, few Americans believe that international concerns are among the most important problems facing the country. However, the public has definite views on international issues. And there are some sharp differences between Republicans and Democrats.

Commentary Oct. 16, 2012

China’s public getting more negative about the world

Chinese views about other major nations have become more negative in recent years. In particular, attitudes toward the U.S. have cooled – ratings for President Obama have declined, and fewer Chinese now describe their country’s relationship with the U.S. as one of cooperation.

Commentary Oct. 16, 2012

China inequality causes unease

Despite more than 90% of Chinese feeling that they enjoy a higher standard of living than their parents, concerns over corruption, social inequality and food safety are growing.

Oct. 16, 2012

How the Chinese View Other Countries

As China is projecting its power abroad and preparing for a change of leadership at home, the Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes Project asked the Chinese public what it thought of other countries, especially its neighbors. The Project’s spring survey also asked people in a number of other countries what they thought of China. Some […]

Survey Reports Oct. 16, 2012

Growing Concerns in China about Inequality, Corruption

Ratings for the U.S. Decline

Commentary Sep. 24, 2012

Russians Have Their Own Ideas of Democracy

The Kremlin’s demand that the U.S. Agency for International Development cease its activities in Russia follows months of accusations by Vladimir Putin that recent anti-government protests in Russia are the result of meddling by the U.S. and other Western governments. However, many Russians may not be convinced that such meddling is a fact.

Commentary Sep. 21, 2012

How China became the US election bogeyman

With about half of Americans saying China’s rise is a major threat to the U.S., fears about China have fed into the U.S. presidential campaign. Overall, Republicans are more concerned than Democrats about China.

Commentary Sep. 19, 2012

Wait, You Still Don’t Like Us?

While the image of the United States has improved throughout many parts of the world during Barack Obama’s presidency, negative views of America remain stubbornly persistent in key Muslim countries. Much of this animosity is due to continuing concerns about U.S. power and widespread opposition to major elements of American foreign policy.

Commentary Sep. 18, 2012

How Americans See China

Most Americans describe relations between the U.S. and China as good, but most consider China a competitor rather than an enemy or partner. When asked which country represents the greatest danger to the U.S., more Americans volunteer China than name any other country, including Iran and North Korea.

Survey Reports Sep. 18, 2012

U.S. Public, Experts Differ on China Policies

Public Deeply Concerned about China's Economic Power

Survey Reports Sep. 10, 2012

Deepening Economic Doubts in India

Strong Support for Improving Relations with Pakistan

Commentary Sep. 7, 2012

Have Americans Turned Inward?

At a time when the U.S. is still at war in Afghanistan, when in the eyes of foreigners U.S. stature as the hegemonic power is in question, and when a euro crisis could derail the American economy’s tenuous recovery, voters are turning inward. Nevertheless, when American national security is seen as threatened by Iran or terrorism, voters remain aggressively internationalist.

Commentary Sep. 6, 2012

U.S. Voters Mull the Economy

Public opinion surveys show that economic issues are a foremost concern for American voters. Recent history suggests that voters’ choice on November 6 will have implications not just for the economic health of the U.S. but also the global economy.

Commentary Aug. 27, 2012

Does World Want Romney or Obama?

At the Republican and Democratic National Conventions, Americans will notionally be choosing their candidates for president of the United States. The world’s citizens get no say in this choice. Nevertheless, people outside the U.S. have definite opinions about Obama and some of the key issues in the campaign.

Commentary Aug. 9, 2012

World to America: We want soft, not hard power

With less than three months to go in the U.S. presidential election, the candidates’ debate over America’s place in the world can only be expected to escalate. Recent public opinion surveys suggest that people outside the United States question American hard power and increasingly embrace U.S. soft power. Whoever is president in 2013, the success abroad of his foreign policy may depend on achieving the right balance in the exercise of American hard and soft power.

Commentary Aug. 3, 2012

Muslims Want Democracy

Since the beginning of the Arab Spring, analysts, policymakers, and pundits have debated whether democracy will actually take root in the Middle East. One thing, however, is clear: People in Arab nations want democracy, and they don’t just support a vague notion of democracy – they want to live in a country that has specific rights and institutions.

Commentary Jul. 26, 2012

The World Is Losing Faith in Hard Work

Add faith in the work ethic and in capitalism to the lengthening list of casualties from the Great Recession. Four years after the Lehman Brothers’ fiasco and the ensuing global economic downturn, the idea that effort in a competitive economy can lead to success is seriously questioned in a number of major economies, including Japan, Russia and Greece, especially among those who have suffered the most.

Commentary Jul. 12, 2012

Emerging Economies – Rich And Confident

The emerging economies account for an increasing share of the globe’s billionaires. But widespread public attitudes can wield far more influence over an economy than the wealth of a few hundred people. While people polled in the US and Europe are pessimistic about their future prospects, citizens of the emerging economies, especially China and Brazil, are optimistic about their own national economies and personal wealth.

Commentary Jul. 12, 2012

The Missing Piece In Arab Democracy

More than a year after the 2011 uprisings, Arab publics are concerned about the economy, but hopeful about democracy.

Survey Reports Jul. 12, 2012

Pervasive Gloom About the World Economy

Faith in Hard Work, Capitalism Falter; But Emerging Markets Upbeat