Jan. 5, 2006

Russia’s Weakened Democratic Embrace

The latest Pew Global Attitudes poll finds the Russian people would choose a strong economy over a good democracy by a margin of almost six to one.

Jul. 14, 2005

About the Pew Global Attitudes Project

The Pew Global Attitudes Project is a series of worldwide public opinion surveys encompassing a broad array of subjects ranging from people’s assessments of their own lives to their views about the current state of the world and important issues of the day. The Pew Global Attitudes Project is co-chaired by former U.S. Secretary of […]

Jul. 14, 2005

I. How Muslims and Westerners See Each Other

While there are concerns in Western countries about Islamic identity and extremism, these do not necessarily translate into unfavorable views of people of the Muslim faith. In Europe and North America, majorities in Great Britain, France, Canada, the U.S., and Russia, as well as pluralities in Spain and Poland, say they have somewhat or very […]

Jul. 14, 2005

III. How Muslims See Themselves and Islam’s Role

The importance of Islam in the political life of many countries where it is the predominant religion is underscored by the large percentages in these countries saying that they think of themselves first as a Muslim, rather than as a citizen of their particular country. Large majorities in Pakistan (79%), Morocco (70%) and Jordan (63%) […]

Jul. 14, 2005

IV. How Muslims View Relations with the World

Large majorities of Muslims in most predominantly Muslim countries surveyed think that it is very important that Islam play a more important and influential role in the world than that religion now does. In Morocco, 84% of Muslims subscribe to this view, as do 73% in Jordan, 70% in Pakistan and 64% in Indonesia. Even […]

Jul. 14, 2005

II. How Non-Muslim Publics View Muslims

Public attitudes toward Muslims and concerns over Islamic extremism are remarkably consistent in Western Europe, the U.S., and other countries with sizeable Muslim minorities. Majorities in all Western European countries as well as Canada, India and Russia agree that Muslims coming to their countries want to be distinct from the larger country instead of adopting […]

Jul. 14, 2005

Methodological Appendix

About the 2005 Global Attitudes Survey Results for the survey are based on telephone and face-to-face interviews conducted under the direction of Princeton Survey Research Associates International. All surveys are based on national samples except in China, India, Morocco and Pakistan where the sample was disproportionately or exclusively urban. The table below shows the margin […]

Jul. 14, 2005

Islamic Extremism: Common Concern for Muslim and Western Publics

Concerns over Islamic extremism, extensive in the West even before this month’s terrorist attacks in London, are shared to a considerable degree by the publics in several predominantly Muslim nations surveyed.

Jun. 23, 2005

Survey Methods

            

Jun. 23, 2005

Chapter 1. Image of the United States

Even though the image of the United States has improved slightly in some parts of the world over the past year, this country’s global approval ratings trail well behind those of other leading nations. When the publics of the 16 nations covered by the survey were asked to give favorability ratings of five major leading […]

Jun. 23, 2005

U.S. Image Up Slightly, But Still Negative

Anti-Americanism in Europe, the Middle East and Asia, which surged as a result of the U.S. war in Iraq, shows modest signs of abating. But the United States remains broadly disliked in most countries surveyed, and the opinion of the American people is not as positive as it once was.

Jun. 23, 2005

Chapter 2. Image of the American People

In all Global Attitudes surveys dating back to 2002, the rest of the world has held the American people in higher esteem than it has held America. That is still the case now, but in several countries around the world, the gap has narrowed. This shift in perceptions is most apparent in Indonesia, where since […]

Jun. 23, 2005

Chapter 3. Opinions of U.S. Policies

A continuing source of resentment toward the U.S. is the view that America pays little if any attention to the interests of other countries in making international policy decisions. Americans, as might be expected, do not subscribe to this view. Two-thirds of the U.S. public says the United States pays either a great deal (28%) […]

Jun. 23, 2005

Chapter 4. Views of America’s Role in the World

The January elections in Iraq did not cast the U.S. in a more favorable light in most of the countries surveyed. Only in the Netherlands and Germany do small majorities (55% and 50% respectively) say that the Iraq elections led them to have a more favorable opinion of the U.S. However, pluralities in Canada and […]

Jun. 23, 2005

Chapter 5. Other Findings

There is substantial support in most countries for a military rival to challenge America’s global dominance. But the idea of China, in particular, emerging as the counterforce to the U.S. draws a more mixed reaction, especially in Europe. Throughout Europe, majorities feel it would be a bad thing if China were to become as militarily […]

Mar. 16, 2004

Survey Report

U.S. Image Still Poor America’s image abroad remains negative in most nations, though it has improved somewhat in Russia, Turkey, and Pakistan. Vast majorities in predominantly Muslim countries continue to hold unfavorable opinions of the U.S, though the intensity of anti-American views has moderated. Opinion of the U.S. in Russia is now about evenly divided, […]

Mar. 16, 2004

About the Survey

Surveys for the Pew Global Attitudes Project were conducted February 19-March 3, 2004 in nine nations under the direction of Princeton Survey Research Associates International. Telephone interviews were conducted among a nationwide, representative sample of 1,000 adults, 18 years of age or older, in the United States, 500 in Great Britain, 504 in France, and […]

Mar. 16, 2004

A Year After Iraq War

A year after the war in Iraq, discontent with America and its policies has intensified rather than diminished. Opinion of the United States in France and Germany is at least as negative now as at the war’s conclusion, and British views are decidedly more critical. Perceptions of American unilateralism remain widespread in European and Muslim nations, and the war in Iraq has undermined America’s credibility abroad. Doubts about the motives behind the U.S.-led war on terrorism abound, and a growing percentage of Europeans want foreign policy and security arrangements independent from the United States. Across Europe, there is considerable support for the European Union to become as powerful as the United States.