Multi-section ReportsOctober 16, 2012

Growing Concerns in China about Inequality, Corruption

While China prepares for a leadership change, the Chinese people believe their country is facing growing challenges, including rising prices, inequality, corruption, and consumer safety. The Chinese public is also increasingly expressing reservations about relations with the U.S.

CommentarySeptember 24, 2012

Russians Have Their Own Ideas of Democracy

The Kremlin’s demand that the U.S. Agency for International Development cease its activities in Russia follows months of accusations by Vladimir Putin that recent anti-government protests in Russia are the result of meddling by the U.S. and other Western governments. However, many Russians may not be convinced that such meddling is a fact.

CommentarySeptember 19, 2012

Wait, You Still Don’t Like Us?

While the image of the United States has improved throughout many parts of the world during Barack Obama’s presidency, negative views of America remain stubbornly persistent in key Muslim countries. Much of this animosity is due to continuing concerns about U.S. power and widespread opposition to major elements of American foreign policy.

CommentaryAugust 3, 2012

Muslims Want Democracy

Since the beginning of the Arab Spring, analysts, policymakers, and pundits have debated whether democracy will actually take root in the Middle East. One thing, however, is clear: People in Arab nations want democracy, and they don’t just support a vague notion of democracy – they want to live in a country that has specific rights and institutions.

CommentaryJuly 12, 2012

The Missing Piece In Arab Democracy

More than a year after the 2011 uprisings, Arab publics are concerned about the economy, but hopeful about democracy.

Multi-section ReportsJuly 10, 2012

Most Muslims Want Democracy, Personal Freedoms, and Islam in Political Life

More than a year after the first stirrings of the Arab Spring, there continues to be a strong desire for democracy in Arab and other predominantly Muslim nations. A substantial number in key Muslim countries also want a large role for Islam in political life. Meanwhile, few think the U.S. favors democracy in the Middle East.

CommentaryMay 23, 2012

Egypt on the Eve of Elections: Economy, Democracy Are Both Priorities

On the eve of the first presidential election of the post-Mubarak era, Egyptians remain hopeful about the future of their country, and they strongly desire both an improved economy and the democratic freedoms they were denied under the previous regime.

Multi-section ReportsMay 23, 2012

Russians Back Protests, Political Freedoms

A solid majority of Russians see attending protests as an opportunity to speak out about how the government is run, and more than half specifically approve of the mass demonstrations that followed the December 2011 parliamentary vote, which was marred by fraud allegations. Nonetheless, 72% of Russians voice a favorable opinion of Vladimir Putin.

Multi-section ReportsMay 8, 2012

Egyptians Remain Optimistic, Embrace Democracy and Religion in Political Life

A year after the ouster of Hosni Mubarak, a new nationwide survey finds that Egyptians remain upbeat about the course of the nation and prospects for progress. Most Egyptians continue to support democracy, and most also want Islam to play a major role in society.

Multi-section ReportsDecember 5, 2011

Confidence in Democracy and Capitalism Wanes in Former Soviet Union

Two decades after the Soviet Union’s collapse, Russians, Ukrainians, and Lithuanians are unhappy with the direction of their countries and disillusioned with the state of their politics. Enthusiasm for democracy and capitalism has waned considerably over the past 20 years, and most believe the changes that have taken place since 1991 have had a […]

Multi-section ReportsJuly 21, 2011

Muslim-Western Tensions Persist

Muslim and Western publics continue to largely agree that relations between them are poor, and disagree about who is at fault – Muslims largely blame Westerners, while those in the West generally blame Muslims. However, in both Western and predominantly Muslim nations, there is a shared concern about the threat posed by Islamic extremism.

Multi-section ReportsMay 17, 2011

Arab Spring Fails to Improve U.S. Image

Support for democracy is high throughout much of the Middle East, but the Arab Spring has not led to an improvement in America’s image in the region. Instead, in key Arab nations and in other predominantly Muslim countries, views of the U.S. remain negative. On balance, extremist groups also viewed negatively, although they receive significant levels of support in some countries.

Multi-section ReportsApril 25, 2011

Egyptians Embrace Revolt Leaders, Religious Parties and Military, As Well

Egyptians of all ages, from all walks of life, and parts of the country continue to celebrate the dramatic political changes their nation has undergone. Overwhelmingly, they say it is good that former president Hosni Mubarak is gone. Nearly two-in-three are satisfied with the way things are going in Egypt, and most are optimistic about their country’s future.

CommentaryMarch 8, 2011

Will Enthusiasm for Democracy Endure in Egypt and Elsewhere?

Pro-democracy movements in Tunisia and Egypt recall the wave of democratization that took place two decades ago in Eastern Europe. The experience of Eastern Europe is a useful reminder that public enthusiasm for democracy is not guaranteed as political change extends over years and decades.

CommentaryJanuary 31, 2011

Egypt, Democracy and Islam

Majorities of Egyptian Muslims believe that democracy is preferable to any other kind of government, and by wide margins, Muslims in Egypt say that Islam plays a positive role in their country’s politics.

Multi-section ReportsDecember 2, 2010

Muslim Publics Divided on Hamas and Hezbollah

Extremist groups Hamas and Hezbollah continue to receive mixed ratings from Muslim publics. However, opinions of al Qaeda and its leader, Osama bin Laden, are consistently negative; only in Nigeria do Muslims offer views that are, on balance, positive toward al Qaeda and bin Laden.

CommentaryMay 19, 2010

Czechs’ Commitment to Free Markets and Democracy Stays Strong Amidst Troubled Economic and Political Waters

With an election approaching, Czechs are unhappy with conditions in their country and frustrated with the way democracy is working, but are committed to free market economics and democratic values.

CommentaryApril 7, 2010

Hungary Dissatisfied with Democracy, but Not Its Ideals

With parliamentary elections approaching, Hungarians are dissatisfied with their economy and with the current state of democracy in their country. However, they still value democratic rights and institutions.

CommentaryJanuary 20, 2010

The Post-Communist Generation in the Former Eastern Bloc

Members of the post-communist generation offer much more positive evaluations of the political and economic changes their countries have undergone over the past two decades than do those who were adults when communism collapsed.

MultimediaNovember 2, 2009

Public Opinion Two Decades After the Fall of the Berlin Wall

Multi-section ReportsNovember 2, 2009

End of Communism Cheered but Now with More Reservations

Publics of former Iron Curtain countries generally look back approvingly at the collapse of communism. Majorities in most former Soviet republics and Eastern European countries endorse the emergence of democracy and capitalism. However, the initial enthusiasm about these changes has dimmed in most of the countries surveyed.

CommentaryFebruary 27, 2008

Putin’s Popularity Propels Chosen Successor in Russian Election

Russians Prefer Strength in Their Leader, Economy over Democracy

Multi-section ReportsOctober 4, 2007

World Publics Welcome Global Trade — But Not Immigration

The publics of the world broadly embrace key tenets of economic globalization but fear the disruptions and downsides of participating in the global economy. In rich countries as well as poor ones, most people endorse free trade, multinational corporations and free markets. However, the latest Pew Global Attitudes survey of more than 45,000 people finds they are concerned about inequality, threats to their culture, threats to the environment and the threats posed by immigration. And there are signs that enthusiasm for economic globalization is waning in the West.

Multi-section ReportsJuly 24, 2007

A Rising Tide Lifts Mood in the Developing World

A 47-nation survey finds that as economic growth has surged in much of Latin America, East Europe and Asia over the past five years, people are expressing greater satisfaction with their personal lives, family incomes and national conditions. The picture is different in most advanced nations, where growth has been less robust and citizen satisfaction has changed little since 2002.

Multi-section ReportsJune 22, 2006

The Great Divide: How Westerners and Muslims View Each Other

After a year marked by riots over cartoon portrayals of Muhammad, a major terrorist attack in London, and continuing wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, most Muslims and Westerners see relations between them as generally bad.

PublicationsJanuary 5, 2006

Russia’s Weakened Democratic Embrace

The latest Pew Global Attitudes poll finds the Russian people would choose a strong economy over a good democracy by a margin of almost six to one.

CommentaryNovember 10, 2005

How the United States is Perceived in the Arab and Muslim Worlds

Testimony of Andrew Kohut, U.S. House International Relations Committee, Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations

Multi-section ReportsJune 23, 2005

U.S. Image Up Slightly, But Still Negative

Anti-Americanism in Europe, the Middle East and Asia, which surged as a result of the U.S. war in Iraq, shows modest signs of abating. But the United States remains broadly disliked in most countries surveyed, and the opinion of the American people is not as positive as it once was.

CommentaryFebruary 3, 2005

Iraqi Vote Mirrors Desire for Democracy in Muslim World

A Pew Global Attitudes Project commentary

CommentaryMay 13, 2004

Global Gender Gaps

By Nicole Speulda and Mary McIntosh