CommentaryDecember 4, 2012

Anti-Americanism Down in Europe, but a Values Gap Persists

Europeans generally reacted positively to President Obama’s re-election, just as they did four years ago. But despite Obama’s re-election at home and continued popularity in Europe, his presidency has not closed the long-running transatlantic values gap on issues such as the use of military force, religion, and individualism.

Multi-section ReportsNovember 17, 2011

The American-Western European Values Gap

American values differ from those of Western Europeans in many important ways. Most notably, Americans are more individualistic and are less supportive of a strong safety net than are the publics of Spain, Britain, France and Germany. However, Americans are coming closer to Europeans in not seeing their culture as superior to that of other nations.

Multi-section ReportsJune 17, 2010

Obama More Popular Abroad Than At Home, Global Image of U.S. Continues to Benefit

As the global economy begins to rebound from the great recession, people around the world remain deeply concerned with the way things are going in their countries. Less than a third of the publics in most nations say they are satisfied with national conditions, as overwhelming numbers say their economies are in bad shape. […]

Multi-section ReportsNovember 2, 2009

End of Communism Cheered but Now with More Reservations

Publics of former Iron Curtain countries generally look back approvingly at the collapse of communism. Majorities in most former Soviet republics and Eastern European countries endorse the emergence of democracy and capitalism. However, the initial enthusiasm about these changes has dimmed in most of the countries surveyed.

Multi-section ReportsSeptember 17, 2008

Unfavorable Views of Jews and Muslims on the Increase in Europe

Growing numbers of people in several major European countries say they have an unfavorable opinion of Jews, and opinions of Muslims also are more negative than they were several years ago. These findings are from a new Pew Global Attitudes Project report, based on data gathered from 24 countries from regions throughout the world, that examine worldwide religiosity and take a close look at Muslim publics’ attitudes toward terrorism, Osama bin Laden, Hamas, Hezbollah and more.

CommentaryApril 1, 2008

America’s Catholics Occupy a Unique Place in the World of Religion

U.S. Catholics Occupy Something of a Middle Ground in the Catholic Faith

Multi-section ReportsOctober 4, 2007

World Publics Welcome Global Trade — But Not Immigration

The publics of the world broadly embrace key tenets of economic globalization but fear the disruptions and downsides of participating in the global economy. In rich countries as well as poor ones, most people endorse free trade, multinational corporations and free markets. However, the latest Pew Global Attitudes survey of more than 45,000 people finds they are concerned about inequality, threats to their culture, threats to the environment and the threats posed by immigration. And there are signs that enthusiasm for economic globalization is waning in the West.

Multi-section ReportsJune 23, 2005

U.S. Image Up Slightly, But Still Negative

Anti-Americanism in Europe, the Middle East and Asia, which surged as a result of the U.S. war in Iraq, shows modest signs of abating. But the United States remains broadly disliked in most countries surveyed, and the opinion of the American people is not as positive as it once was.

CommentaryMay 13, 2004

Global Gender Gaps

By Nicole Speulda and Mary McIntosh

PublicationsDecember 19, 2002

Among Wealthy Nations …

For an updated analysis of the link between religiosity and wealth, see World Publics Welcome Global Trade — But Not Immigration. Religion is much more important to Americans than to people living in other wealthy nations. Six-in-ten (59%) people in the U.S. say religion plays a very important role in their lives. This is […]