CommentaryAugust 27, 2012

Does World Want Romney or Obama?

At the Republican and Democratic National Conventions, Americans will notionally be choosing their candidates for president of the United States. The world’s citizens get no say in this choice. Nevertheless, people outside the U.S. have definite opinions about Obama and some of the key issues in the campaign.

Multi-section ReportsMay 8, 2012

Egyptians Remain Optimistic, Embrace Democracy and Religion in Political Life

A year after the ouster of Hosni Mubarak, a new nationwide survey finds that Egyptians remain upbeat about the course of the nation and prospects for progress. Most Egyptians continue to support democracy, and most also want Islam to play a major role in society.

Multi-section ReportsMay 17, 2011

Arab Spring Fails to Improve U.S. Image

Support for democracy is high throughout much of the Middle East, but the Arab Spring has not led to an improvement in America’s image in the region. Instead, in key Arab nations and in other predominantly Muslim countries, views of the U.S. remain negative. On balance, extremist groups also viewed negatively, although they receive significant levels of support in some countries.

Multi-section ReportsApril 25, 2011

Egyptians Embrace Revolt Leaders, Religious Parties and Military, As Well

Egyptians of all ages, from all walks of life, and parts of the country continue to celebrate the dramatic political changes their nation has undergone. Overwhelmingly, they say it is good that former president Hosni Mubarak is gone. Nearly two-in-three are satisfied with the way things are going in Egypt, and most are optimistic about their country’s future.

Multi-section ReportsJune 17, 2010

Obama More Popular Abroad Than At Home, Global Image of U.S. Continues to Benefit

As the global economy begins to rebound from the great recession, people around the world remain deeply concerned with the way things are going in their countries. Less than a third of the publics in most nations say they are satisfied with national conditions, as overwhelming numbers say their economies are in bad shape. […]

MultimediaJune 17, 2010

2010 Pew Global Attitudes Press Conference Video

Sec. Madeleine Albright, Sen. John Danforth and Andrew Kohut discuss the latest findings from the Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes poll at the National Press Club in Washington, DC.

Multi-section ReportsSeptember 23, 2009

Most Mexicans See Better Life in U.S. – One-In-Three Would Migrate

Mexicans are overwhelmingly dissatisfied with the direction of their country and nearly six-in-ten say those who leave their country for the United States enjoy a better life there. One-in-three would move to the U.S. if they had the opportunity.

Multi-section ReportsAugust 13, 2009

Pakistani Public Opinion

Pakistani public opinion has turned against al Qaeda and the Taliban, and no fewer than 69% of those polled express worry that extremists will take control of the nation. Ratings for President Asif Ali Zardari have also plummeted, as Pakistanis see their country in crisis.

MultimediaJuly 23, 2009

2009 Press Conference: Part 8

Q & A

MultimediaJuly 23, 2009

2009 Press Conference: Part 6

John Danforth

MultimediaJuly 23, 2009

2009 Press Conference: Part 5

Madeleine Albright

MultimediaJuly 23, 2009

2009 Press Conference: Part 4

Andrew Kohut: (3 of 3)

MultimediaJuly 23, 2009

2009 Press Conference: Part 2

Andrew Kohut: (1 of 3)

Multi-section ReportsJuly 23, 2009

Confidence in Obama Lifts U.S. Image Around the World

The image of the United States has improved markedly in most parts of the world reflecting global confidence in Barack Obama. In many countries, opinions of the U.S. are now about as positive as they were at the beginning of the decade before George W. Bush took office.

MultimediaJuly 23, 2009

Pew Global Attitudes Project Press Conference Video National Press Club (7/23/09)

Introduction by Donald Kimelman of The Pew Charitable Trusts. (2:17 video) Opening remarks by Andrew Kohut, President of Pew Research Center, on how global public opinion of the United States has changed since Barack Obama took office. (9:56 video) Remarks by Andrew Kohut, President of Pew Research Center, on views of the global recession, trade, […]

MultimediaJuly 23, 2009

Lessons from the 2009 Global Attitudes Survey

EVENT TRANSCRIPT At a briefing for journalists at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. on July 23, 2009, Pew Research Center President Andrew Kohut, joined by Pew Global Attitudes Project co-chairs former U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright and former Sen. John C. Danforth, described the major findings from the latest Pew Global […]

CommentaryDecember 18, 2008

Global Public Opinion in the Bush Years (2001-2008)

Once he takes office, President-elect Barack Obama will have to navigate a world that has grown highly critical of the United States. Since 2001, the Pew Global Attitudes Project has documented a decline in America’s international image amid widespread opposition to U.S. foreign policy.

Multi-section ReportsJune 12, 2008

Global Economic Gloom – China and India Notable Exceptions

The latest Pew Global Attitudes survey finds some encouraging signs for America’s global image for the first time this decade. Although views of the United States remain negative in much of the world, favorable ratings have increased modestly since 2007 in 10 of 21 countries where comparative data are available. Many people around the world are paying close attention to the U.S. presidential election.

Multi-section ReportsMarch 16, 2004

A Year After Iraq War

A year after the war in Iraq, discontent with America and its policies has intensified rather than diminished. Opinion of the United States in France and Germany is at least as negative now as at the war’s conclusion, and British views are decidedly more critical. Perceptions of American unilateralism remain widespread in European and Muslim nations, and the war in Iraq has undermined America’s credibility abroad. Doubts about the motives behind the U.S.-led war on terrorism abound, and a growing percentage of Europeans want foreign policy and security arrangements independent from the United States. Across Europe, there is considerable support for the European Union to become as powerful as the United States.

PublicationsApril 17, 2002

Americans and Europeans Differ Widely on Foreign Policy Issues

A multinational survey conducted in association with the International Herald Tribune and Council on Foreign Relations Europeans have a better opinion of President George W. Bush than they did before the Sept. 11 attacks, but they remain highly critical of the president, most of his policies, and what they see as his unilateral approach […]

Multi-section ReportsAugust 15, 2001

Bush Unpopular in Europe, Seen As Unilateralist

George W. Bush is highly unpopular with the publics of the major nations of Western Europe. By wide margins, people in Germany, France, Great Britain and Italy all disapprove of his handling of international policy, and the American president does not inspire much more confidence in these countries than does Russian President Vladimir Putin. […]