CommentaryDecember 4, 2012

Anti-Americanism Down in Europe, but a Values Gap Persists

Europeans generally reacted positively to President Obama’s re-election, just as they did four years ago. But despite Obama’s re-election at home and continued popularity in Europe, his presidency has not closed the long-running transatlantic values gap on issues such as the use of military force, religion, and individualism.

Multi-section ReportsDecember 5, 2011

Confidence in Democracy and Capitalism Wanes in Former Soviet Union

Two decades after the Soviet Union’s collapse, Russians, Ukrainians, and Lithuanians are unhappy with the direction of their countries and disillusioned with the state of their politics. Enthusiasm for democracy and capitalism has waned considerably over the past 20 years, and most believe the changes that have taken place since 1991 have had a […]

Multi-section ReportsNovember 17, 2011

The American-Western European Values Gap

American values differ from those of Western Europeans in many important ways. Most notably, Americans are more individualistic and are less supportive of a strong safety net than are the publics of Spain, Britain, France and Germany. However, Americans are coming closer to Europeans in not seeing their culture as superior to that of other nations.

Multi-section ReportsNovember 2, 2009

End of Communism Cheered but Now with More Reservations

Publics of former Iron Curtain countries generally look back approvingly at the collapse of communism. Majorities in most former Soviet republics and Eastern European countries endorse the emergence of democracy and capitalism. However, the initial enthusiasm about these changes has dimmed in most of the countries surveyed.

Multi-section ReportsJuly 23, 2009

Confidence in Obama Lifts U.S. Image Around the World

The image of the United States has improved markedly in most parts of the world reflecting global confidence in Barack Obama. In many countries, opinions of the U.S. are now about as positive as they were at the beginning of the decade before George W. Bush took office.

Multi-section ReportsOctober 4, 2007

World Publics Welcome Global Trade — But Not Immigration

The publics of the world broadly embrace key tenets of economic globalization but fear the disruptions and downsides of participating in the global economy. In rich countries as well as poor ones, most people endorse free trade, multinational corporations and free markets. However, the latest Pew Global Attitudes survey of more than 45,000 people finds they are concerned about inequality, threats to their culture, threats to the environment and the threats posed by immigration. And there are signs that enthusiasm for economic globalization is waning in the West.

CommentaryJune 6, 2006

Two Americas, One American

The Differences that Divide Us are Much Smaller than Those that Set Us Apart from the Rest of the World

CommentaryJanuary 14, 2004

Americans and Canadians

The North American Not-so-odd Couple

CommentaryDecember 10, 2003

Anti-Americanism: Causes and Characteristics

Recent Commentary by Andrew Kohut