CommentarySeptember 21, 2012

How China became the US election bogeyman

With about half of Americans saying China’s rise is a major threat to the U.S., fears about China have fed into the U.S. presidential campaign. Overall, Republicans are more concerned than Democrats about China.

CommentarySeptember 18, 2012

How Americans See China

Most Americans describe relations between the U.S. and China as good, but most consider China a competitor rather than an enemy or partner. When asked which country represents the greatest danger to the U.S., more Americans volunteer China than name any other country, including Iran and North Korea.

Survey ReportsSeptember 18, 2012

U.S. Public, Experts Differ on China Policies

While nearly two-thirds of Americans describe relations between the U.S. and China as good, most are concerned about China’s growing economic strength. Compared with the general public, U.S. foreign affairs experts are less likely to see China as an economic threat and less concerned about Beijing’s rising power.

Survey ReportsSeptember 10, 2012

Deepening Economic Doubts in India

The economic euphoria in India over the last few years, inspired by the country’s seemingly inevitable march toward double-digit growth, has soured. Although still relatively upbeat compared with many other countries, the Indian public’s confidence in their country’s direction and future economic growth has declined significantly.

Survey ReportsJune 27, 2012

Pakistani Public Opinion Ever More Critical of U.S.

Following a year of tensions between their country and the United States, Pakistanis continue to hold highly unfavorable views of the U.S. and offer bleak assessments of the relationship between the two nations. And President Obama is held in exceedingly low regard. Additionally, over the last few years, Pakistanis have become less willing to work with the U.S. on efforts to combat extremist groups.

Survey ReportsJune 5, 2012

Japanese Wary of Nuclear Energy

Seven-in-ten Japanese say their country should reduce its reliance on nuclear energy. Skepticism about nuclear power is coupled with widespread dissatisfaction with the government’s performance: eight-in-ten say the government has done a poor job dealing with the Fukushima crisis and six-in-ten disapprove of how Tokyo has handled the overall recovery from the earthquake and tsunami.

CommentaryJuly 14, 2011

The World Says China Will Overtake America

In the past decade, anti-Americanism grew around the world. In sharp contrast, today America is seen as on its way to losing its status as the dominant global superpower.

Survey ReportsJuly 13, 2011

China Seen Overtaking U.S. as Global Superpower

The United States continues to receive positive ratings in much of the world, but it faces the new challenge of doubts about its superpower status. Publics around the world increasingly believe that China either will replace or already has replaced the U.S. as the world’s leading superpower.

Survey ReportsJune 21, 2011

U.S. Image in Pakistan Falls No Further Following bin Laden Killing

America’s image among Pakistanis remains poor, and most disapprove of the U.S. raid that killed bin Laden. Extremist groups also remain unpopular, although support for using the Pakistani military against extremists has waned. Most name India as the top threat to Pakistan. Overall, the public mood in Pakistan is grim – 92% are dissatisfied with the country’s direction.

Survey ReportsJune 1, 2011

Japanese Resilient, but See Economic Challenges Ahead

In the aftermath of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, the Japanese public is resilient. Indeed, a majority believe that as a result of the disaster, Japan will become a stronger nation. And while personal pessimism about the future has crept up slightly, on balance the public’s overall sense of personal well being appears little changed by the calamitous events of 2011.

CommentaryMarch 31, 2011

Upbeat Chinese Public May Not Be Primed for a Jasmine Revolution

Judging the Chinese appetite for democracy is not easy, but polling suggests China may not be ripe for the kind of uprisings seen throughout the Middle East.

Survey ReportsOctober 20, 2010

Indians See Threat From Pakistan, Extremist Groups

More than seven-in-ten Indians have confidence in Barack Obama and about two-thirds express a favorable opinion of the U.S. Indians are also upbeat about their country’s economic situation and its role in world affairs. Still, most say India faces major challenges, including crime and corruption. And there are widespread concerns about Pakistan and extremist groups like Lashkar-e-Taiba.

Survey ReportsJuly 29, 2010

Concern About Extremist Threat Slips in Pakistan

Overwhelmingly, Pakistanis see terrorism as a major problem in their country and most have negative views of the Taliban and al Qaeda, but they have become less concerned over the last year that extremists will take over Pakistan. Meanwhile, Pakistanis continue to express serious concerns about the U.S. and their longtime rival India.

MultimediaJuly 29, 2010

Regional Map of Pakistan

Survey ReportsJune 17, 2010

Obama More Popular Abroad Than At Home, Global Image of U.S. Continues to Benefit

As the global economy begins to rebound from the great recession, people around the world remain deeply concerned with the way things are going in their countries. Less than a third of the publics in most nations say they are satisfied with national conditions, as overwhelming numbers say their economies are in bad shape. […]

CommentaryMarch 18, 2010

Indonesia: The Obama Effect

President Barack Obama’s popularity has transformed America’s image in Indonesia. However, the world’s largest predominantly Muslim country is an outlier in the Muslim world, where opinions of the U.S. remain mostly negative.

CommentaryNovember 12, 2009

Obama Popular in Japan, China and South Korea

Opinion of Obama is largely positive in Japan, China and South Korea, but improvements in U.S. image are modest compared with much of the world

CommentaryAugust 31, 2009

Few in NATO Support Call For Additional Forces in Afghanistan

Troop increases may face considerable opposition in many NATO countries, which were opposed to Obama?s original call for more forces

Survey ReportsAugust 13, 2009

Pakistani Public Opinion

Pakistani public opinion has turned against al Qaeda and the Taliban, and no fewer than 69% of those polled express worry that extremists will take control of the nation. Ratings for President Asif Ali Zardari have also plummeted, as Pakistanis see their country in crisis.

CommentaryMarch 12, 2009

Few in Pakistan Support Extremists

But Few Favor Military Confrontation

CommentaryDecember 18, 2008

Global Public Opinion in the Bush Years (2001-2008)

Once he takes office, President-elect Barack Obama will have to navigate a world that has grown highly critical of the United States. Since 2001, the Pew Global Attitudes Project has documented a decline in America’s international image amid widespread opposition to U.S. foreign policy.

CommentaryDecember 4, 2008

India

Global Optimism, Local Fears

CommentarySeptember 22, 2008

A New Leader for a Chronically Gloomy Japan

Economic Concerns Pervasive in Japan

Survey ReportsSeptember 17, 2008

Unfavorable Views of Jews and Muslims on the Increase in Europe

Growing numbers of people in several major European countries say they have an unfavorable opinion of Jews, and opinions of Muslims also are more negative than they were several years ago. These findings are from a new Pew Global Attitudes Project report, based on data gathered from 24 countries from regions throughout the world, that examine worldwide religiosity and take a close look at Muslim publics’ attitudes toward terrorism, Osama bin Laden, Hamas, Hezbollah and more.

Survey ReportsJuly 22, 2008

The Chinese Celebrate Their Roaring Economy, As They Struggle With Its Costs

The 2008 Pew Global Attitudes survey in China finds that more than eight-in-ten Chinese are satisfied with their country’s overall direction and their national economy, a significant increase in contentment from earlier in the decade. But levels of personal satisfaction are generally lower than the national measures, and the poll suggests the Chinese people – who express concern about inflation and pollution – may be struggling with the consequences of economic growth.

Survey ReportsJune 12, 2008

Global Economic Gloom – China and India Notable Exceptions

The latest Pew Global Attitudes survey finds some encouraging signs for America’s global image for the first time this decade. Although views of the United States remain negative in much of the world, favorable ratings have increased modestly since 2007 in 10 of 21 countries where comparative data are available. Many people around the world are paying close attention to the U.S. presidential election.

CommentaryDecember 28, 2007

View from Pakistan

Prior to the Bhutto Assassination, Public Opinion Was Increasingly Opposed to Terrorism

CommentaryDecember 11, 2007

How the World Sees China

Negative Views of the US More Common Than Negative Views of China

CommentaryAugust 8, 2007

Musharraf’s Support Shrinks, Even As More Pakistanis Reject Terrorism… and the U.S.

And Negative Views of Musharraf Are on the Rise

Survey ReportsJuly 24, 2007

A Rising Tide Lifts Mood in the Developing World

A 47-nation survey finds that as economic growth has surged in much of Latin America, East Europe and Asia over the past five years, people are expressing greater satisfaction with their personal lives, family incomes and national conditions. The picture is different in most advanced nations, where growth has been less robust and citizen satisfaction has changed little since 2002.