Jul. 14, 2014

Global Opposition to U.S. Surveillance and Drones, but Limited Harm to America’s Image

Revelations about the scope of American electronic surveillance efforts have generated headlines around the world. A new Pew Research Center survey finds widespread decline in the view that the U.S. respects the personal freedoms of its people. But in most countries there is little evidence this opposition has severely harmed America’s overall image.

Apr. 9, 2014

Support in Principle for U.S.-EU Trade Pact

Survey Report The European Union and the United States are negotiating the most economically significant regional free trade agreement in history: the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). Publics in Germany and the United States support TTIP and trade expansion in general, especially with each other. But when it comes to specifics, both Americans and […]

Jul. 18, 2013

America’s Global Image Remains More Positive than China’s

Publics around the world believe the global balance of power is shifting. China’s economic power is on the rise, and many think it will eventually supplant the United States as the world’s dominant superpower. However, China’s increasing power has not led to more positive ratings for the People’s Republic. Overall, the U.S. enjoys a […]

Apr. 1, 2013

Americans’ Support for TPP Remains Untested

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s announcement that Japan will join negotiations to create a Trans-Pacific Partnership with the U.S. and other Pacific Basin nations won early support from the Japanese people, according to snap surveys following his statement. The decision was also welcomed in official circles in Washington, D.C., where the Obama administration has long supported Japan becoming party to the talks.

Dec. 10, 2012

U.S.-China Economic Relations in the Wake of the U.S. Election

What does Obama’s return to the White House portend for U.S.-China economic relations? The U.S. public wants Washington to ratchet up the pressure on Beijing, but history suggests that there are geo-political constraints to doing so.

Nov. 1, 2012

How Americans and Chinese View Each Other

Over the past year, public opinion surveys in the United States and China have shown evidence of rising tensions between the two countries on a host of issues. These include increasingly negative perceptions of each other and concern over economic and trade policies. This infographic explores these views. For more, see our collection of reports […]

Nov. 1, 2012

American, Chinese Publics Increasingly Wary of the Other

As economic and geopolitical competition grows between the U.S. and China, Americans say they want to get tougher with China on economic issues and the Chinese hold a more negative view of relations with the U.S.

Oct. 16, 2012

How the Chinese View Other Countries

As China is projecting its power abroad and preparing for a change of leadership at home, the Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes Project asked the Chinese public what it thought of other countries, especially its neighbors. The Project’s spring survey also asked people in a number of other countries what they thought of China. Some […]

Oct. 16, 2012

Growing Concerns in China about Inequality, Corruption

While China prepares for a leadership change, the Chinese people believe their country is facing growing challenges, including rising prices, inequality, corruption, and consumer safety. The Chinese public is also increasingly expressing reservations about relations with the U.S.

Sep. 18, 2012

U.S. Public, Experts Differ on China Policies

While nearly two-thirds of Americans describe relations between the U.S. and China as good, most are concerned about China’s growing economic strength. Compared with the general public, U.S. foreign affairs experts are less likely to see China as an economic threat and less concerned about Beijing’s rising power.

Jun. 27, 2012

Pakistani Public Opinion Ever More Critical of U.S.

Following a year of tensions between their country and the United States, Pakistanis continue to hold highly unfavorable views of the U.S. and offer bleak assessments of the relationship between the two nations. And President Obama is held in exceedingly low regard. Additionally, over the last few years, Pakistanis have become less willing to work with the U.S. on efforts to combat extremist groups.

Jun. 20, 2012

Mexicans Back Military Campaign Against Cartels

As Felipe Calderón’s term as Mexico’s president draws to a close, Mexicans continue to strongly back his policy of deploying the military to combat the country’s powerful drug cartels, despite public unease about the moral cost of the drug war. Meanwhile, a majority of Mexicans say they have a positive opinion of the U.S.

Jun. 21, 2011

U.S. Image in Pakistan Falls No Further Following bin Laden Killing

America’s image among Pakistanis remains poor, and most disapprove of the U.S. raid that killed bin Laden. Extremist groups also remain unpopular, although support for using the Pakistani military against extremists has waned. Most name India as the top threat to Pakistan. Overall, the public mood in Pakistan is grim – 92% are dissatisfied with the country’s direction.

Oct. 20, 2010

Indians See Threat From Pakistan, Extremist Groups

More than seven-in-ten Indians have confidence in Barack Obama and about two-thirds express a favorable opinion of the U.S. Indians are also upbeat about their country’s economic situation and its role in world affairs. Still, most say India faces major challenges, including crime and corruption. And there are widespread concerns about Pakistan and extremist groups like Lashkar-e-Taiba.

Aug. 12, 2010

Mexicans Continue Support for Drug War

As drug violence continues to plague their country, Mexicans largely endorse President Felipe Calderón’s campaign against drug cartels. Most also believe the Mexican military is making progress in the drug war, although they are less likely to hold this view now than was the case one year ago.

Jul. 29, 2010

Concern About Extremist Threat Slips in Pakistan

Overwhelmingly, Pakistanis see terrorism as a major problem in their country and most have negative views of the Taliban and al Qaeda, but they have become less concerned over the last year that extremists will take over Pakistan. Meanwhile, Pakistanis continue to express serious concerns about the U.S. and their longtime rival India.

Mar. 18, 2010

Indonesia: The Obama Effect

President Barack Obama’s popularity has transformed America’s image in Indonesia. However, the world’s largest predominantly Muslim country is an outlier in the Muslim world, where opinions of the U.S. remain mostly negative.

Dec. 3, 2009

Negative Views of U.S. Unchanged in Turkey

While overall ratings for the U.S. have improved throughout much of the world, in Turkey they remain dismal. Still, there are modest signs of a potential for improvement.

Sep. 23, 2009

Most Mexicans See Better Life in U.S. – One-In-Three Would Migrate

Mexicans are overwhelmingly dissatisfied with the direction of their country and nearly six-in-ten say those who leave their country for the United States enjoy a better life there. One-in-three would move to the U.S. if they had the opportunity.

Aug. 13, 2009

Pakistani Public Opinion

Pakistani public opinion has turned against al Qaeda and the Taliban, and no fewer than 69% of those polled express worry that extremists will take control of the nation. Ratings for President Asif Ali Zardari have also plummeted, as Pakistanis see their country in crisis.

Mar. 12, 2009

Few in Pakistan Support Extremists

But Few Favor Military Confrontation

Nov. 16, 2006

Bush Visits Indonesia

President travels to a country with volatile views of U.S.

Feb. 28, 2006

India: Pro-America, Pro-Bush

Bucking the Global Trend, U.S. Popularity Soared among Indians in ’05

Mar. 18, 2003

America’s Image Further Erodes, Europeans Want Weaker Ties

Introduction and Summary Anti-war sentiment and disapproval of President Bush’s international policies continue to erode America’s image among the publics of its allies. U.S. favorability ratings have plummeted in the past six months in countries actively opposing war ­ France, Germany and Russia ­ as well as in countries that are part of the “coalition […]