CommentaryDecember 10, 2012

U.S.-China Economic Relations in the Wake of the U.S. Election

What does Obama’s return to the White House portend for U.S.-China economic relations? The U.S. public wants Washington to ratchet up the pressure on Beijing, but history suggests that there are geo-political constraints to doing so.

PublicationsNovember 1, 2012

How Americans and Chinese View Each Other

Over the past year, public opinion surveys in the United States and China have shown evidence of rising tensions between the two countries on a host of issues. These include increasingly negative perceptions of each other and concern over economic and trade policies. This infographic explores these views.

CommentaryNovember 1, 2012

American, Chinese Publics Increasingly Wary of the Other

As economic and geopolitical competition grows between the U.S. and China, Americans say they want to get tougher with China on economic issues and the Chinese hold a more negative view of relations with the U.S.

CommentaryOctober 16, 2012

China’s public getting more negative about the world

Chinese views about other major nations have become more negative in recent years. In particular, attitudes toward the U.S. have cooled – ratings for President Obama have declined, and fewer Chinese now describe their country’s relationship with the U.S. as one of cooperation.

CommentaryOctober 16, 2012

China inequality causes unease

Despite more than 90% of Chinese feeling that they enjoy a higher standard of living than their parents, concerns over corruption, social inequality and food safety are growing.

Survey ReportsOctober 16, 2012

Growing Concerns in China about Inequality, Corruption

While China prepares for a leadership change, the Chinese people believe their country is facing growing challenges, including rising prices, inequality, corruption, and consumer safety. The Chinese public is also increasingly expressing reservations about relations with the U.S.

CommentarySeptember 21, 2012

How China became the US election bogeyman

With about half of Americans saying China’s rise is a major threat to the U.S., fears about China have fed into the U.S. presidential campaign. Overall, Republicans are more concerned than Democrats about China.

Survey ReportsSeptember 18, 2012

U.S. Public, Experts Differ on China Policies

While nearly two-thirds of Americans describe relations between the U.S. and China as good, most are concerned about China’s growing economic strength. Compared with the general public, U.S. foreign affairs experts are less likely to see China as an economic threat and less concerned about Beijing’s rising power.