PublicationsMay 10, 2018

Where do foreign student graduates work in the United States?

Explore the movement of international graduates in the 61 metro areas where at least 5,000 foreign graduates applied and were approved for OPT.

PublicationsMay 10, 2018

Foreign students who stayed and worked in the U.S. under OPT after graduation by metro area, 2004-2016

Details on the 113 metro areas that had 2,000 or more foreign students approved for the U.S. government’s Optional Practical Training (OPT) program from 2004 to 2016.

PublicationsMay 10, 2018

Number of Foreign College Students Staying and Working in U.S. After Graduation Surges

The federal Optional Practical Training program saw a 400% increase in foreign students graduating and working in STEM fields between 2008 and 2016.

PublicationsApril 24, 2018

Sub-Saharan African Immigrants in the U.S. Are Often More Educated Than Those in Top European Destinations

Sub-Saharan immigrants in the United States are also more highly educated than the U.S. native born population.

PublicationsNovember 20, 2017

Facts on Foreign Students in the U.S.

The U.S. has more foreign students enrolled in its colleges and universities than any other country in the world. Much of the growth in foreign students has happened since the start of the Great Recession.

Survey ReportsNovember 6, 2014

Crime and Corruption Top Problems in Emerging and Developing Countries

Crime and corruption, common scourges of modern societies, top the list of problems cited by publics in emerging and developing nations.

CommentaryJanuary 4, 2013

Indians Support Gender Equality But Still Give Men Edge in Workplace, Higher Education

The recent gang rape and killing of a young woman in New Delhi – and the subsequent protests – have focused worldwide attention on gender issues in India. A 2010 survey that examined attitudes about gender around the world sheds some light on how public opinion in India compares to the other 21 nations surveyed.

Survey ReportsAugust 23, 2011

Americans Want More Pressure on Students, the Chinese Want Less

Americans are considerably more likely than other publics polled to say that parents do not put enough pressure on their children, while China is the only country in which a majority sees parents putting too much pressure on students. More than six-in-ten Americans say that parents do not put enough pressure on their children to do well in school, while about two-thirds of the Chinese public take the opposite position.

CommentaryAugust 24, 2006

Parental Pressure on Students

Not Enough in America; Too Much in Asia