CommentaryJanuary 10, 2013

2013: A Fateful Year

The year ahead promises both challenges and opportunities for transatlantic relations. The next 12 months could prove to be consequential for both security and economic ties between Europe and the United States.

CommentaryDecember 14, 2012

Americans on Middle East turmoil: Keep us out of it

The pace of change in the Middle East – in Syria, Egypt, Palestine and Israel – is accelerating as 2012 draws to a close. But the American people are not paying attention and are deeply skeptical of greater U.S. engagement in a corner of the world that looks increasingly unstable.

CommentaryNovember 8, 2012

Transatlantic Relations in Obama’s Second Term

The re-election of Barack Obama as the next president of the United States has ramifications—good, bad and indifferent—for transatlantic relations.

CommentaryAugust 3, 2012

Muslims Want Democracy

Since the beginning of the Arab Spring, analysts, policymakers, and pundits have debated whether democracy will actually take root in the Middle East. One thing, however, is clear: People in Arab nations want democracy, and they don’t just support a vague notion of democracy – they want to live in a country that has specific rights and institutions.

CommentaryJuly 12, 2012

The Missing Piece In Arab Democracy

More than a year after the 2011 uprisings, Arab publics are concerned about the economy, but hopeful about democracy.

Multi-section ReportsJuly 10, 2012

Most Muslims Want Democracy, Personal Freedoms, and Islam in Political Life

More than a year after the first stirrings of the Arab Spring, there continues to be a strong desire for democracy in Arab and other predominantly Muslim nations. A substantial number in key Muslim countries also want a large role for Islam in political life. Meanwhile, few think the U.S. favors democracy in the Middle East.

CommentaryJune 28, 2012

Morsi’s Election Highlights Egyptian Views of Islam’s Role in New Democracy

The declaration of Mohamed Morsi as Egypt’s first freely elected president marks a major milestone for a country that until February 2011 had spent nearly three decades under the authoritarian rule of Hosni Mubarak. At the same time, for significant numbers of Egyptians, Morsi’s relatively narrow victory over former Prime Minister Ahmed Shafiq has the potential to raise questions about Islam’s role in society.

Multi-section ReportsJune 21, 2012

Widespread Condemnation for Assad in Neighboring Countries

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad is widely unpopular in neighboring countries and the vast majority of Jordanians, Egyptians, Tunisians and Turks would like to see him step down. Even though many would like to see Assad out of office, there is limited support for tougher international economic sanctions or Arab military intervention, and very little support for Western military action.

CommentaryMay 23, 2012

Egypt on the Eve of Elections: Economy, Democracy Are Both Priorities

On the eve of the first presidential election of the post-Mubarak era, Egyptians remain hopeful about the future of their country, and they strongly desire both an improved economy and the democratic freedoms they were denied under the previous regime.

Multi-section ReportsMay 18, 2012

A Global “No” To a Nuclear-Armed Iran

Ahead of negotiations over Iran’s nuclear program, a 21-nation survey finds that most publics around the world are broadly opposed to Iran obtaining nuclear weapons, and many support economic sanctions to prevent such an acquisition. Opinion is more divided on whether military intervention should be used, especially among the six E3+3 negotiating partners.

Multi-section ReportsMay 8, 2012

Egyptians Remain Optimistic, Embrace Democracy and Religion in Political Life

A year after the ouster of Hosni Mubarak, a new nationwide survey finds that Egyptians remain upbeat about the course of the nation and prospects for progress. Most Egyptians continue to support democracy, and most also want Islam to play a major role in society.

Multi-section ReportsJune 7, 2011

On Eve of Elections, a More Upbeat Mood in Turkey

As Turks prepare for national elections on June 12, they are increasingly upbeat about the direction of their country. And at a time when publics around the world generally remain gloomy about their economies, Turks are becoming more positive.

Multi-section ReportsMay 17, 2011

Arab Spring Fails to Improve U.S. Image

Support for democracy is high throughout much of the Middle East, but the Arab Spring has not led to an improvement in America’s image in the region. Instead, in key Arab nations and in other predominantly Muslim countries, views of the U.S. remain negative. On balance, extremist groups also viewed negatively, although they receive significant levels of support in some countries.

Multi-section ReportsApril 25, 2011

Egyptians Embrace Revolt Leaders, Religious Parties and Military, As Well

Egyptians of all ages, from all walks of life, and parts of the country continue to celebrate the dramatic political changes their nation has undergone. Overwhelmingly, they say it is good that former president Hosni Mubarak is gone. Nearly two-in-three are satisfied with the way things are going in Egypt, and most are optimistic about their country’s future.

CommentaryMarch 8, 2011

Will Enthusiasm for Democracy Endure in Egypt and Elsewhere?

Pro-democracy movements in Tunisia and Egypt recall the wave of democratization that took place two decades ago in Eastern Europe. The experience of Eastern Europe is a useful reminder that public enthusiasm for democracy is not guaranteed as political change extends over years and decades.

CommentaryJanuary 31, 2011

Egypt, Democracy and Islam

Majorities of Egyptian Muslims believe that democracy is preferable to any other kind of government, and by wide margins, Muslims in Egypt say that Islam plays a positive role in their country’s politics.

Multi-section ReportsSeptember 7, 2010

Turks Downbeat About Their Institutions

Confidence in Turkish institutions and leaders – including the military, religious leaders, and the prime minster – has declined over the last few years. And Turks continue to express largely negative views of major world powers.

Multi-section ReportsJune 17, 2010

Obama More Popular Abroad Than At Home, Global Image of U.S. Continues to Benefit

As the global economy begins to rebound from the great recession, people around the world remain deeply concerned with the way things are going in their countries. Less than a third of the publics in most nations say they are satisfied with national conditions, as overwhelming numbers say their economies are in bad shape. […]

Multi-section ReportsFebruary 4, 2010

Mixed Views of Hamas and Hezbollah in Largely Muslim Nations

Across predominantly Muslim nations, there is little enthusiasm for the extremist Islamic organizations Hamas and Hezbollah, although there are pockets of support for both groups, especially in the Middle East.

CommentaryDecember 3, 2009

Negative Views of U.S. Unchanged in Turkey

While overall ratings for the U.S. have improved throughout much of the world, in Turkey they remain dismal. Still, there are modest signs of a potential for improvement.

CommentaryNovember 18, 2009

Europeans and Americans Share Concerns About Iran’s Nuclear Program

Europeans and Americans share concerns about Iran’s emergent nuclear capabilities, though Russians are less worried.

CommentaryJanuary 29, 2009

Ideological Gaps Over Israel on Both Sides of Atlantic

The American public has long expressed strong support for Israel. In a survey conducted earlier this month during the conflict in the Gaza Strip, 49% of Americans said they sympathized more with Israel in its dispute with the Palestinians, while just 11% sympathized more with the Palestinians and 15% said they sympathized with neither side. […]

CommentaryJanuary 8, 2009

Before Israel’s Invasion, Hamas Popularity Was Waning Among Its Neighbors — Even in Gaza Itself

by Richard Wike, Associate Director, Pew Global Attitudes Project In the Middle East and elsewhere, Muslim reaction to the Israeli offensive in the Hamas-controlled Gaza Strip has been swift and angry, with protests in Amman, Beirut, Istanbul, Tehran, Jakarta, and several other capitals. Palestinians in East Jerusalem and in the West Bank, where Hamas rival […]

CommentaryJuly 16, 2008

Obamamania Abroad

The Candidate Can Expect a Warm Welcome in Europe, Not So in the Middle East

CommentaryNovember 27, 2007

Will Shared Concern about Iran Provide Common Ground for Middle East Negotiators in Annapolis?

Will Shared Concerns About Iran Promote Compromise?

CommentaryNovember 15, 2007

Lebanon’s Precarious Politics

Many of the Country’s Sectarian Differences Do Not Run Along a Straight Muslim-Christian Fault Line

CommentaryOctober 25, 2007

Turkey and Its (Many) Discontents

The Turkish Public’s Opinions of America Have Hit Rock Bottom

Multi-section ReportsJuly 24, 2007

A Rising Tide Lifts Mood in the Developing World

A 47-nation survey finds that as economic growth has surged in much of Latin America, East Europe and Asia over the past five years, people are expressing greater satisfaction with their personal lives, family incomes and national conditions. The picture is different in most advanced nations, where growth has been less robust and citizen satisfaction has changed little since 2002.

Multi-section ReportsJune 27, 2007

Global Unease With Major World Powers

A 47-nation survey finds global public opinion increasingly wary of the world’s dominant nations and disapproving of their leaders. Anti-Americanism is extensive, as it has been for the past five years. At the same time, the image of China has slipped significantly among the publics of other major nations.

CommentaryNovember 27, 2006

Turkey: Troubled Terrain for Pope Benedict

The Pontiff Visits a Country Where Negative Views of Christians and the West Are on the Rise